SAMSON

steam-tug icon

SAMSON

Years Active: 1900-1945
Vessel Type: Iron Steam Tug
Steam Tug
Nationality: Falkland Islands
Beached in Stanley Harbour after being torn from her moorings during a fierce gale on 2nd April 1945.

Main Use:

Towing

Years Active:

1900-1945

Power:

Earle & Co. Triple Expansion Engine; 60RHP

Built:

1888

Size:

96.73 Gross, 31.69 Net tons
28.93 x 5.39 x 2.65 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Earle’s Co. Ltd, Hull, Yorkshire, England
Main Use: Towing
Built: 1888
Power: Earle & Co. Triple Expansion Engine; 60RHP
Design/Build: Earle’s Co. Ltd, Hull, Yorkshire, England
Size: 96.73 Gross, 31.69 Net tons
Dimensions: 28.93 x 5.39 x 2.65 metres
Between 1900-1915 SAMSON towed into Stanley over 40 ships, fought fires in some, including GREAT BRITAIN in 1905; LEON BUREAU (1906); GLADOVA (1908); LONSDALE (1909) and rescued many mariners from wrecks around the islands including notably: HÉLÈNE BLUM in 1908 on the Seal Rocks; MALVINA (1910) in Reef Channel; INVERNESSSHIRE (1910) Bull Point; most famously the P.S.N.C. mail Steamer ORAVIA (1912) on the Billy Rocks. It was the SAMSON that towed the LADY ELIZABETH into Stanley in 1913, and her last recorded tow was the Schooner PAX in 1915. Towards the end of her active life, she was regularly employed conveying people and supplies to the many Falkland Islands Company farm settlements. In 1923 SAMSON was converted into a Lighter, for transshipment, a role she performed for 22 years. After being torn from her moorings in the gale of 2nd April 1945, she ended up on the beach east of the Narrows on the north east coast of the Harbour.
Between 1900-1915 SAMSON towed into Stanley over 40 ships, fought fires in some, including GREAT BRITAIN in 1905; LEON BUREAU (1906); GLADOVA (1908); LONSDALE (1909) and rescued many mariners from wrecks around the islands including notably: HÉLÈNE BLUM in 1908 on the Seal Rocks; MALVINA (1910) in Reef Channel; INVERNESSSHIRE (1910) Bull Point; most famously the P.S.N.C. mail Steamer ORAVIA (1912) on the Billy Rocks. It was the SAMSON that towed the LADY ELIZABETH into Stanley in 1913, and her last recorded tow was the Schooner PAX in 1915. Towards the end of her active life, she was regularly employed conveying people and supplies to the many Falkland Islands Company farm settlements. In 1923 SAMSON was converted into a Lighter, for transshipment, a role she performed for 22 years. After being torn from her moorings in the gale of 2nd April 1945, she ended up on the beach east of the Narrows on the north east coast of the Harbour.

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