ROBERT FULTON

fully rigged ship icon

ROBERT FULTON

Vessel Type: 3-masted full-rigged Ship
Full-rigged
Nationality: American
Wrecked after striking North East Island, near Lively Island, East Falkland at a speed of 10.5 knots in August 1849. 42 passengers and crew survived.

Main Use:

Cargo and Passenger

Years Active:

Power:

Sail

Built:

Size:

600 Net tons

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Main Use: Cargo and Passenger
Power: Sail
Size: 600 Net tons
The New York registered ROBERT FULTON, Captain George Chase, who also part owned the vessel with William Bourn, was on a voyage from New York to San Francisco with a general cargo on 12th August 1849. Captain’s official insurance claim protest included “at 17:55, ship struck on a small island lying off the North East point of Lively Island. Immediately hauled everything aback and endeavoured, by every possible means, to get the ship off, but to no purpose. The night being very dark and the land low we could not see in time to save the ship, which at the time she struck, was going ten and a half knots per hour [sic]. Ran onto a ledge of rock and filled within thirty minutes after she struck. At midnight, the ship thumping heavily, we landed the passengers and crew, forty-two in number, safely, and at daylight commenced landing necessaries…” It is clear from the Captain’s statement that she was not wrecked on Prong Point, Lively Island, six miles south, as is often the popular belief.
The New York registered ROBERT FULTON, Captain George Chase, who also part owned the vessel with William Bourn, was on a voyage from New York to San Francisco with a general cargo on 12th August 1849. Captain’s official insurance claim protest included “at 17:55, ship struck on a small island lying off the North East point of Lively Island. Immediately hauled everything aback and endeavoured, by every possible means, to get the ship off, but to no purpose. The night being very dark and the land low we could not see in time to save the ship, which at the time she struck, was going ten and a half knots per hour [sic]. Ran onto a ledge of rock and filled within thirty minutes after she struck. At midnight, the ship thumping heavily, we landed the passengers and crew, forty-two in number, safely, and at daylight commenced landing necessaries…” It is clear from the Captain’s statement that she was not wrecked on Prong Point, Lively Island, six miles south, as is often the popular belief.

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