PORCUPINE

schooner icon

PORCUPINE

Years Active: 1836-1854+
Vessel Type: Schooner
Schooner
Nationality: English
Arrived in Port Stanley in January 1853 seeking repairs and medical help after being attacked by natives in canoes in Tierra del Fuego.

Main Use:

Cargo and Passenger

Years Active:

1836-1854+

Power:

Sail

Built:

1836

Size:

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Shoreham, Sussex, England
Main Use: Cargo and Passenger
Built: 1836
Power: Sail
Design/Build: Shoreham, Sussex, England
On or before 5th January 1853, the PORCUPINE, 150 Days out from Liverpool arrived in Stanley for repairs and medical aid. The captain and three men had been wounded by Tierra del Fuegians. According to a newspaper report: “Passing through the Straits of Magellan, on her way to California, the PORCUPINE grounded. Early the next morning the ship was surrounded by numerous canoes, full of natives. The captain thought they might be useful in getting the ship off, but observing the fleet of canoes approaching nearer, many, bearing lighted pine branches, gave orders for the crew and passengers, most of whom had revolvers, to arm themselves, and a terrific conflict ensued; the savages fought desperately and tried to burn the ship. After a severe struggle and great slaughter, they were beaten off, and with 300 bags of oats thrown overboard, the ship floated. Two of the passengers were killed, and several others severely wounded. The ship returned to the Falkland Islands terribly disabled.”
On or before 5th January 1853, the PORCUPINE, 150 Days out from Liverpool arrived in Stanley for repairs and medical aid. The captain and three men had been wounded by Tierra del Fuegians. According to a newspaper report: “Passing through the Straits of Magellan, on her way to California, the PORCUPINE grounded. Early the next morning the ship was surrounded by numerous canoes, full of natives. The captain thought they might be useful in getting the ship off, but observing the fleet of canoes approaching nearer, many, bearing lighted pine branches, gave orders for the crew and passengers, most of whom had revolvers, to arm themselves, and a terrific conflict ensued; the savages fought desperately and tried to burn the ship. After a severe struggle and great slaughter, they were beaten off, and with 300 bags of oats thrown overboard, the ship floated. Two of the passengers were killed, and several others severely wounded. The ship returned to the Falkland Islands terribly disabled.”

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