JHELUM

barque icon

JHELUM

Years Active: 1849-1970s
Vessel Type: Barque
Barque
Nationality: English
After arriving in Stanley on 19th Aug 1870 ‘in a leaky state’, the vessel was surveyed on 3rd September and found to be unseaworthy and condemned.

Main Use:

Cargo

Years Active:

1849-1970s

Power:

Sail

Built:

1849

Size:

428.35 Net tons
37.52 x 8.44 x 5.52 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Joseph Steel & Sons at Liverpool, Lancashire, England
Main Use: Cargo
Built: 1849
Power: Sail
Design/Build: Joseph Steel & Sons at Liverpool, Lancashire, England
Size: 428.35 Net tons
Dimensions: 37.52 x 8.44 x 5.52 metres
The East-Indiaman JHELUM after arriving in Stanley in a leaky state, underwent several surveys, before her master Charles Beaglehole accepted that she was condemned. She stood, facing West, at the head of Packe’s Jetty, the aft half used as a storage facility. In the mid 1960’s she was used to store drums of aviation fuel for the Government’s de Haviland Beaver seaplanes. – In 2008 remedial work was carried out on the open fore half of the ship which was decaying due to worm and weather. The following year, the fore half was removed down to the waterline and in August 2013 the aft half finally collapsed. Feb 2024 The JHELUM looks forlorn with only the starboard aft quarter of the hull still standing, remaining the host of several shag’s nests. — In the 1960s, she was described recently as the last remaining example of her type still visible.
The East-Indiaman JHELUM after arriving in Stanley in a leaky state, underwent several surveys, before her master Charles Beaglehole accepted that she was condemned. She stood, facing West, at the head of Packe’s Jetty, the aft half used as a storage facility. In the mid 1960’s she was used to store drums of aviation fuel for the Government’s de Haviland Beaver seaplanes. – In 2008 remedial work was carried out on the open fore half of the ship which was decaying due to worm and weather. The following year, the fore half was removed down to the waterline and in August 2013 the aft half finally collapsed. Feb 2024 The JHELUM looks forlorn with only the starboard aft quarter of the hull still standing, remaining the host of several shag’s nests. — In the 1960s, she was described recently as the last remaining example of her type still visible.

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