GALEN

fully rigged ship icon

GALEN

Years Active: 1820-1846
Vessel Type: Full rigged wooden ship
Full-rigged
Nationality: American
Wrecked after becoming stuck on a mud bank near Knob Island, West Falkland whilst seeking shelter from a snow and hail storm in February 1846.

Main Use:

Whaling

Years Active:

1820-1846

Power:

Sail

Built:

1820

Size:

365 Net tons

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Main Use: Whaling
Built: 1820
Power: Sail
Size: 365 Net tons
GALEN was rounding the Falklands to the East, and in the belief that they were to the eastward, she changed course to the North. In truth, she had turned into Falkland Sound. Land became evident in all directions; the wind was increasing from the South and with foresail and fore-topmast staysail blown away, she made for shelter, and in doing so, became stuck. – GALEN, Capt. Jonathan Bowers, had on board 1,735 barrels of whale oil almost all of which was saved and shipped to Rio de Janeiro where most was sold, and the funds reinvested in coffee upon which a profit was eventually made. Some oil was transshipped to New York. — It is clear from the copious documentation in the Falkland Islands National Archive that Captain Bowers was unstinting in his efforts to save all possible of his ship and cargo. Despite this, a significant North American Whaling website states “Wrecked Falkland Is, Feb 20th[sic] 1846 intentionally”. [This to be corrected soon, as a result of this research.]
GALEN was rounding the Falklands to the East, and in the belief that they were to the eastward, she changed course to the North. In truth, she had turned into Falkland Sound. Land became evident in all directions; the wind was increasing from the South and with foresail and fore-topmast staysail blown away, she made for shelter, and in doing so, became stuck. – GALEN, Capt. Jonathan Bowers, had on board 1,735 barrels of whale oil almost all of which was saved and shipped to Rio de Janeiro where most was sold, and the funds reinvested in coffee upon which a profit was eventually made. Some oil was transshipped to New York. — It is clear from the copious documentation in the Falkland Islands National Archive that Captain Bowers was unstinting in his efforts to save all possible of his ship and cargo. Despite this, a significant North American Whaling website states “Wrecked Falkland Is, Feb 20th[sic] 1846 intentionally”. [This to be corrected soon, as a result of this research.]

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