FRANCES

brig icon

FRANCES

Years Active: 1827-1842
Vessel Type: Brig
Brig
Nationality: American
On 15th February 1842 whilst heading for New Island in thick fog, the FRANCES was blown, by a strong wind, onto the northwest coast of New Island.

Main Use:

Whaling

Years Active:

1827-1842

Power:

Sail

Built:

1827

Size:

97 net tons

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Stonington, Connecticut, USA
Main Use: Whaling
Built: 1827
Power: Sail
Design/Build: Stonington, Connecticut, USA
Size: 97 net tons
From Captain William Holland’s log: “15th February: Begins with strong wind from N.W. and thick foggy weather, steering E.N.E. The first Mate reported that the FRANCES was ashore. The helm was put down and the brig put on stays. Looking astern I saw the land and breakers close under the stern, with FRANCES having stern way. I could see no possibility of getting offshore again being in the kelp, and a heavy sea running, and the land close on the weather bow, I gave orders to clear away the boats. At that time, part of the main boom fell, I could see no other prospect of saving our lives only by taking to our boat, and immediately she struck against the West side of New Island. As it was so dark, we were forced to stay where we were till day light to find out what part of the Falklands we were.”
From Captain William Holland’s log: “15th February: Begins with strong wind from N.W. and thick foggy weather, steering E.N.E. The first Mate reported that the FRANCES was ashore. The helm was put down and the brig put on stays. Looking astern I saw the land and breakers close under the stern, with FRANCES having stern way. I could see no possibility of getting offshore again being in the kelp, and a heavy sea running, and the land close on the weather bow, I gave orders to clear away the boats. At that time, part of the main boom fell, I could see no other prospect of saving our lives only by taking to our boat, and immediately she struck against the West side of New Island. As it was so dark, we were forced to stay where we were till day light to find out what part of the Falklands we were.”

Explore more wrecks and vessels through time

Vessel thumbnail
1 vessels
Vessel thumbnail
4 vessels
Vessel thumbnail
22 vessels
Vessel thumbnail
7 vessels
Vessel thumbnail
4 vessels
Vessel thumbnail
3 vessels
Vessel thumbnail
1 vessels

Find vessels on our Wreckmap