FORTUNA

schooner icon

FORTUNA

Years Active: 1876-1906
Vessel Type: 2-Masted Schooner
Schooner
Nationality: Falkland Islands
After 12 years in the Falklands, grounded on a reef at the northern end of West Island in Falkland Sound in May 1906 and was declared a total loss.

Main Use:

Passenger and cargo coaster

Years Active:

1876-1906

Power:

Sail

Built:

1876

Size:

192.40 Gross, 163.77 Net tons
39.84 x 7.80 x 4.18 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

G. Inman & Son at Lymington, Hampshire, England
Main Use: Passenger and cargo coaster
Built: 1876
Power: Sail
Design/Build: G. Inman & Son at Lymington, Hampshire, England
Size: 192.40 Gross, 163.77 Net tons
Dimensions: 39.84 x 7.80 x 4.18 metres
The FORTUNA was a beautiful and fast ship, formerly a Royal Yacht Squadron racing schooner. She arrived in the Falklands on 6th April 1894 and gave 12 years of unblemished service carrying cargo and passengers. After she ran aground during the day of 19th May 1906, under the command of Captain Robert Rowlands, her crew tried to refloat her. A kedge anchor was run out and the cable worked with the winch, without success. Cargo was thrown overboard but she remained firmly stuck. After 12 hours she began to leak. The passengers, who remained on board, were in a distressed state. Their children, who had been asleep, were got up and dressed, and the adults sat all night on the steps of the cabin stairs, each with a child in his or her arms ready at a moment’s notice to abandon ship. When morning broke, the passengers were evacuated on to West Island. A subsequent Board of Trade inquiry exonerated Captain Rowlands finding that “every effort had been made to refloat the schooner”.
The FORTUNA was a beautiful and fast ship, formerly a Royal Yacht Squadron racing schooner. She arrived in the Falklands on 6th April 1894 and gave 12 years of unblemished service carrying cargo and passengers. After she ran aground during the day of 19th May 1906, under the command of Captain Robert Rowlands, her crew tried to refloat her. A kedge anchor was run out and the cable worked with the winch, without success. Cargo was thrown overboard but she remained firmly stuck. After 12 hours she began to leak. The passengers, who remained on board, were in a distressed state. Their children, who had been asleep, were got up and dressed, and the adults sat all night on the steps of the cabin stairs, each with a child in his or her arms ready at a moment’s notice to abandon ship. When morning broke, the passengers were evacuated on to West Island. A subsequent Board of Trade inquiry exonerated Captain Rowlands finding that “every effort had been made to refloat the schooner”.

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