COLONSAY

fully rigged ship icon

COLONSAY

Years Active: 1858-1860
Vessel Type: Full-rigged Ship
Full-rigged
Nationality: Scottish
Struck a sunken reef off Speedwell Island, East Falkland, in August 1860 and broke up. Her crew, including the captain’s wife, were saved.

Main Use:

Cargo

Years Active:

1858-1860

Power:

Sail

Built:

1858

Size:

598 Gross & Net tons
46.60 x 9.08 x 5.82 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Archibald McMillan & Son, Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire, Scotland
Main Use: Cargo
Built: 1858
Power: Sail
Design/Build: Archibald McMillan & Son, Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire, Scotland
Size: 598 Gross & Net tons
Dimensions: 46.60 x 9.08 x 5.82 metres
The COLONSAY, from Sydney, Australia, was 34 Days out from Callao, Peru bound for Cork in Ireland, carrying a cargo of guano fertiliser, with 18 crew members and the wife of the captain on board. On the evening of 15th August 1860 the captain, using the course steered and the distance run from the last sights that could be depended upon, thought he was to the east of the Falklands. On the morning of the 16th, at about 00:45, the COLONSAY struck a sunken reef and shortly afterwards began to break up. The jolly boat was put over the side and the crew got into it. According to witnesses, as the vessel fell over to landward, she gave shelter to the small boat which remained there until daybreak. With great difficulty the crew and the Captain’s wife managed to get ashore. The Captain meanwhile set out in another small boat and managed to get to a local schooner, MALVINA, which was anchored in Bull Cove, East Falkland. MALVINA later took everyone else on board and landed them at Stanley.
The COLONSAY, from Sydney, Australia, was 34 Days out from Callao, Peru bound for Cork in Ireland, carrying a cargo of guano fertiliser, with 18 crew members and the wife of the captain on board. On the evening of 15th August 1860 the captain, using the course steered and the distance run from the last sights that could be depended upon, thought he was to the east of the Falklands. On the morning of the 16th, at about 00:45, the COLONSAY struck a sunken reef and shortly afterwards began to break up. The jolly boat was put over the side and the crew got into it. According to witnesses, as the vessel fell over to landward, she gave shelter to the small boat which remained there until daybreak. With great difficulty the crew and the Captain’s wife managed to get ashore. The Captain meanwhile set out in another small boat and managed to get to a local schooner, MALVINA, which was anchored in Bull Cove, East Falkland. MALVINA later took everyone else on board and landed them at Stanley.

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