CHARLES COOPER

fully rigged ship icon

CHARLES COOPER

Years Active: 1856-1960
Vessel Type: Full rigged wooden ship
Full-rigged
Nationality: American
Arrived at Stanley on 25 September 1866 in a leaky condition and was subsequently condemned. Rotted away over 150 years due to worm and weather.

Main Use:

Cargo

Years Active:

1856-1960

Power:

Sail

Built:

1856

Size:

977 Net tons
50.29 x 10.79 x 7.01 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

William Hall at Black Rock, Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA
Main Use: Cargo
Built: 1856
Power: Sail
Design/Build: William Hall at Black Rock, Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA
Size: 977 Net tons
Dimensions: 50.29 x 10.79 x 7.01 metres
She was purchased by J. M. Dean and sons for use as a floating storage hulk. About 1895 The CHARLES COOPER was beached alongside, and to the North of, the already beached ACTÆON at the F.I.C.’s West Jetty. She was roofed with corrugated iron and continued to be used for storage until the 1960’s. In 1968 the hulk was sold to the South Street Seaport Museum in New York for $5,000, presumably with the hopes of removing her to New York as allegedly the last example of a North Atlantic Packet Ship. As of April 2024 little remained of her at the West Jetty, apart from some ballast stones and maybe the odd rib. There is however a large section of her bow stored, open to the elements, at Stanley in a yard next to the bypass road. Also, a section of her beautifully carved transom is on view at the Museum.
She was purchased by J. M. Dean and sons for use as a floating storage hulk. About 1895 The CHARLES COOPER was beached alongside, and to the North of, the already beached ACTÆON at the F.I.C.’s West Jetty. She was roofed with corrugated iron and continued to be used for storage until the 1960’s. In 1968 the hulk was sold to the South Street Seaport Museum in New York for $5,000, presumably with the hopes of removing her to New York as allegedly the last example of a North Atlantic Packet Ship. As of April 2024 little remained of her at the West Jetty, apart from some ballast stones and maybe the odd rib. There is however a large section of her bow stored, open to the elements, at Stanley in a yard next to the bypass road. Also, a section of her beautifully carved transom is on view at the Museum.

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