CAPRICORN

barque icon

CAPRICORN

Years Active: 1859-1948
Vessel Type: 3-masted wooden Barque
Barque
Nationality: Chilean
In March 1882 she was beached, on fire, on Staten Island. Her cargo was removed, she was refloated and taken to Stanley, where she was condemned.

Main Use:

Cargo

Years Active:

1859-1948

Power:

Sail

Built:

1859

Size:

390 Gross and Net tons
37.80 x 8.23 x 5.24 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Cox at Bideford, Devon, England
Main Use: Cargo
Built: 1859
Power: Sail
Design/Build: Cox at Bideford, Devon, England
Size: 390 Gross and Net tons
Dimensions: 37.80 x 8.23 x 5.24 metres
After the fire was extinguished, the Schooner IUCUTUJA was hired by the Captain to make several voyages between Staten Island and Stanley to bring the cargo to the Falklands. When the CAPRICORN was light enough to be refloated, she sailed from Staten Island to Stanley arriving there on 05 July 1882, where, after a survey, she was condemned as unseaworthy and sold. She was used for many years as a storage hulk, or lighter, before finally being beached at the western end of the southern coast of Stanley Harbour where a jetty was built out to her. She served as a war time jetty head for the military base there and was broken up, down to the waterline, in 1948. All other jetty head vessels were beached with their bows pointing West, but the CAPRICORN points East. Her Bow and stern posts and most of her ribs were still visible in 2024.
After the fire was extinguished, the Schooner IUCUTUJA was hired by the Captain to make several voyages between Staten Island and Stanley to bring the cargo to the Falklands. When the CAPRICORN was light enough to be refloated, she sailed from Staten Island to Stanley arriving there on 05 July 1882, where, after a survey, she was condemned as unseaworthy and sold. She was used for many years as a storage hulk, or lighter, before finally being beached at the western end of the southern coast of Stanley Harbour where a jetty was built out to her. She served as a war time jetty head for the military base there and was broken up, down to the waterline, in 1948. All other jetty head vessels were beached with their bows pointing West, but the CAPRICORN points East. Her Bow and stern posts and most of her ribs were still visible in 2024.

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