BLUE JACKET

fully rigged ship icon

BLUE JACKET

Years Active: 1854-1869
Vessel Type: 3-masted full-rigged Ship
Full-rigged
Nationality: English
In March 1869 a fire broke out in her cargo hold, which contained gold bullion. After failing to extinguish the blaze, her crew left her to drift.

Main Use:

Cargo and Passenger

Years Active:

1854-1869

Power:

Sail

Built:

1854

Size:

1,442 Net tons
71.63 x 12.68 x 7.32 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Robert E. Jackson, Ewell & Jackson’s, East Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Main Use: Cargo and Passenger
Built: 1854
Power: Sail
Design/Build: Robert E. Jackson, Ewell & Jackson’s, East Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Size: 1,442 Net tons
Dimensions: 71.63 x 12.68 x 7.32 metres
En route from New Zealand to England, with a cargo of gold, cotton, flax, furs and tallow, and 26 passengers, the American-built BLUE JACKET caught fire 400-500 miles east of the Falklands, on 5th March 1869. After fighting the blaze for four days, the crew abandoned ship in a small yacht and two lifeboats, leaving the still burning ship to drift. Her captain commanded the yacht, with 38 on board, including the passengers. The 3rd Mate had 14 crew in one lifeboat. A further 15 were in a second, with the 2nd Mate in charge. Each boat had a quantity of gold bars. As they headed for the Falklands, they became separated. The yacht was picked up by a passing ship with all 38 saved. The 3rd Mate’s boat was at sea for 20 days before being found. Only eight of the 15 were alive. The second lifeboat was never seen again, with all 15 presumed dead. When survivors were put ashore at Stanley the island’s Governor seized 14 gold bars, valuing them at £12,000. No one knows what happened to the rest.
En route from New Zealand to England, with a cargo of gold, cotton, flax, furs and tallow, and 26 passengers, the American-built BLUE JACKET caught fire 400-500 miles east of the Falklands, on 5th March 1869. After fighting the blaze for four days, the crew abandoned ship in a small yacht and two lifeboats, leaving the still burning ship to drift. Her captain commanded the yacht, with 38 on board, including the passengers. The 3rd Mate had 14 crew in one lifeboat. A further 15 were in a second, with the 2nd Mate in charge. Each boat had a quantity of gold bars. As they headed for the Falklands, they became separated. The yacht was picked up by a passing ship with all 38 saved. The 3rd Mate’s boat was at sea for 20 days before being found. Only eight of the 15 were alive. The second lifeboat was never seen again, with all 15 presumed dead. When survivors were put ashore at Stanley the island’s Governor seized 14 gold bars, valuing them at £12,000. No one knows what happened to the rest.

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