AVONA

barque icon

AVONA

Years Active: 1869-1882
Vessel Type: Iron Barque
Barque
Nationality: Welsh
Ran ashore and wrecked at Hut Point, East Falkland, in bad weather In October 1882 due to a navigational miscalculation by her captain and mate.

Main Use:

Cargo

Years Active:

1869-1882

Power:

Sail

Built:

1869

Size:

716 Gross, 696 Net tons
54.56 x 9.30 x 5.64 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Richardson, Duck & Co. Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, England
Main Use: Cargo
Built: 1869
Power: Sail
Design/Build: Richardson, Duck & Co. Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, England
Size: 716 Gross, 696 Net tons
Dimensions: 54.56 x 9.30 x 5.64 metres
On 9th October 1882 AVONA came ashore at Hut Point, near Cape Frehel, at a speed of 3.5 knots. All crew saved and brought into Stanley aboard the local Schooner FAIR ROSAMOND. The Board of Trade Inquiry into the loss of the AVONA concluded that it had been caused by an error of the chronometers which put the ship 44 miles to the east of her true position at 12:00 of the day when she went on shore. The weather in the evening being ‘very thick’, preventing them from seeing the land, and feeling sure the course they were steering would lead them clear of the Falkland Islands. Further, that the vessel was navigated in a careful and proper manner and the lead, being hove, showing 45 fathoms at 18:30, convinced them that they were clear of all danger. Both Captain Stephen Davies and Mate William Davies, were acquitted of any blame, although the Mate was told to be more observant in the future as to the deviation of the compass in iron vessels. Official Number 62,745.
On 9th October 1882 AVONA came ashore at Hut Point, near Cape Frehel, at a speed of 3.5 knots. All crew saved and brought into Stanley aboard the local Schooner FAIR ROSAMOND. The Board of Trade Inquiry into the loss of the AVONA concluded that it had been caused by an error of the chronometers which put the ship 44 miles to the east of her true position at 12:00 of the day when she went on shore. The weather in the evening being ‘very thick’, preventing them from seeing the land, and feeling sure the course they were steering would lead them clear of the Falkland Islands. Further, that the vessel was navigated in a careful and proper manner and the lead, being hove, showing 45 fathoms at 18:30, convinced them that they were clear of all danger. Both Captain Stephen Davies and Mate William Davies, were acquitted of any blame, although the Mate was told to be more observant in the future as to the deviation of the compass in iron vessels. Official Number 62,745.

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