ANNE BROOKS

schooner icon

ANNE BROOKS

Years Active: 1862-1874
Vessel Type: 2-masted Schooner
Schooner
Nationality: English
Blown onto rocks by gale force winds whilst at anchor in Fox Bay, West Falkland, in April 1874. Area where she was wrecked is named after her

Main Use:

Cargo and Passengers

Years Active:

1862-1874

Power:

Sail

Built:

1862

Size:

96 Net tons
23.47 x 6.46 x 3.05 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

Pickersgill & Miller at Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.
Main Use: Cargo and Passengers
Built: 1862
Power: Sail
Design/Build: Pickersgill & Miller at Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.
Size: 96 Net tons
Dimensions: 23.47 x 6.46 x 3.05 metres
On 17th April 1874 ANNE BROOKS, with Captain Smithen at the helm, entered Fox Bay and anchored in a position open to the south. The wind came round to the South before morning and blew a gale. She then parted both cables and went onto the rocks, becoming a hopeless wreck. ANNE BROOKS was not a good sea boat, once described as an ungainly craft, appearing like a balloon sitting on the water. She required so much ballast that little room was left for cargo. The vessel arrived in the Falklands for the first time on 19 March 1874 and was wrecked just thirty days later, on what was her first working voyage for the Falkland Islands Company in Falkland waters. ANNE BROOKS’ ship’s bell is on display at the Museum in Stanley. The bay in which she was wrecked is now curiously named Annie Brook’s Bay (rather than Anne Brooks’ Bay!]
On 17th April 1874 ANNE BROOKS, with Captain Smithen at the helm, entered Fox Bay and anchored in a position open to the south. The wind came round to the South before morning and blew a gale. She then parted both cables and went onto the rocks, becoming a hopeless wreck. ANNE BROOKS was not a good sea boat, once described as an ungainly craft, appearing like a balloon sitting on the water. She required so much ballast that little room was left for cargo. The vessel arrived in the Falklands for the first time on 19 March 1874 and was wrecked just thirty days later, on what was her first working voyage for the Falkland Islands Company in Falkland waters. ANNE BROOKS’ ship’s bell is on display at the Museum in Stanley. The bay in which she was wrecked is now curiously named Annie Brook’s Bay (rather than Anne Brooks’ Bay!]

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