AFTERGLOW aka PORT RICHARD

steam drifter icon

AFTERGLOW aka PORT RICHARD

Years Active: 1918-1945
Vessel Type: Steam Drifter
Steam Drifter
Nationality: Falkland Islands
Torn from her moorings in Stanley Harbour on 2nd April 1945 during a storm, coming to rest as a wreck on the south side opposite the Narrows.

Main Use:

Patrol Vessel

Years Active:

1918-1945

Power:

Pollett & Wigzell reciprocating engine 275ihp

Built:

1918

Size:

112.15 Gross, 49.57 Net tons
28.42 x 5.79 x 2.78 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

J. Chambers Ltd. at Lowestoft, Suffolk, England
Main Use: Patrol Vessel
Built: 1918
Power: Pollett & Wigzell reciprocating engine 275ihp
Design/Build: J. Chambers Ltd. at Lowestoft, Suffolk, England
Size: 112.15 Gross, 49.57 Net tons
Dimensions: 28.42 x 5.79 x 2.78 metres
She arrived in Stanley 1st December 1921 as the AFTERGLOW for use in policing the sealing trade. In 1929 she was sold to the Falkland Islands and Dependencies Sealing Co. Ltd., of Port Stanley for £1,000, for use in the sealing industry, mostly operating out of Albemarle. In November 1933, AFTERGLOW’s name was changed to PORT RICHARD, a name she kept until requisitioned by the Admiralty in November 1939 when her name was changed back to AFTERGLOW. After nearly five years minesweeping and acting as tug/tender to visiting warships, she reverted to her previous owners and her previous name PORT RICHARD. During the Easter Monday gale of 2nd April 1945, she broke her moorings and beached. — PORT RICHARD’s registration was finally closed in July 1949. By April 2024, little remained except her boiler and a few ribs. In the Falklands, the vessel wreck site still almost universally referred to as the AFTERGLOW, or sometimes HMS AFTERGLOW.
She arrived in Stanley 1st December 1921 as the AFTERGLOW for use in policing the sealing trade. In 1929 she was sold to the Falkland Islands and Dependencies Sealing Co. Ltd., of Port Stanley for £1,000, for use in the sealing industry, mostly operating out of Albemarle. In November 1933, AFTERGLOW’s name was changed to PORT RICHARD, a name she kept until requisitioned by the Admiralty in November 1939 when her name was changed back to AFTERGLOW. After nearly five years minesweeping and acting as tug/tender to visiting warships, she reverted to her previous owners and her previous name PORT RICHARD. During the Easter Monday gale of 2nd April 1945, she broke her moorings and beached. — PORT RICHARD’s registration was finally closed in July 1949. By April 2024, little remained except her boiler and a few ribs. In the Falklands, the vessel wreck site still almost universally referred to as the AFTERGLOW, or sometimes HMS AFTERGLOW.

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