ACTAEON

barque icon

ACTAEON

Years Active: 1838-1853
Vessel Type: 3-masted wooden Barque
Barque
Nationality: British
Damaged beyond economic repair whilst rounding Cape Horn with 800 tons of coal bound for San Fransisco. Declared a wreck in Stanley Harbour in 1854.

Main Use:

Cargo

Years Active:

1838-1853

Power:

Sail

Built:

1838

Size:

561 net tons
35.36 x 8.53 x 6.10 metres

(length, breadth, depth) metres

Design/Build:

John Harley
Main Use: Cargo
Built: 1838
Power: Sail
Design/Build: John Harley
Size: 561 net tons
Dimensions: 35.36 x 8.53 x 6.10 metres
The ACTÆON arrived in the Falklands on 27th January 1853, 156 days out of Liverpool, bound for San Francisco, laden with 800 tons of coal, with a Captain Robertson at the helm. She had tried and failed to round Cape Horn several times, and the damage the attempt had caused made her leaky and unseaworthy. On 4th August, 1854, following a survey, ACTÆON was condemned, put up for sale and purchased by J. M. Dean who beached her on the north side of the West Jetty in Stanley Harbour where she was cut down midships to allow access to ships tied alongside. She was joined there later by the wreck of the CHARLES COOPER. By October, 1995, the condition of the ACTÆON, and the CHARLES COOPER, was so poor that they were surrounded with heavy netting to prevent timbers from floating away and becoming a hazard to shipping. Today, little is left to see now apart from her ballast rocks and her stern post and a few odd ribs and those are fast disappearing.
The ACTÆON arrived in the Falklands on 27th January 1853, 156 days out of Liverpool, bound for San Francisco, laden with 800 tons of coal, with a Captain Robertson at the helm. She had tried and failed to round Cape Horn several times, and the damage the attempt had caused made her leaky and unseaworthy. On 4th August, 1854, following a survey, ACTÆON was condemned, put up for sale and purchased by J. M. Dean who beached her on the north side of the West Jetty in Stanley Harbour where she was cut down midships to allow access to ships tied alongside. She was joined there later by the wreck of the CHARLES COOPER. By October, 1995, the condition of the ACTÆON, and the CHARLES COOPER, was so poor that they were surrounded with heavy netting to prevent timbers from floating away and becoming a hazard to shipping. Today, little is left to see now apart from her ballast rocks and her stern post and a few odd ribs and those are fast disappearing.

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